Academic Honesty Policy

Introduction

At Fountainhead school, the academic honesty policy is designed keeping in mind the attributes of learner profile such as ‘Principled’ which means that candidates act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice, and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups, and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them. Also, the values of the school are focusing on the honesty expected from the students in specific and the school community in general in the field of academic research. It also ensures that the student community as whole displays the respect for the integrity of all forms of assessment in MYP and DP. The expectations and practices of Fountainhead school community are guided by its values. Values arise out of what we believe to be important to people, society and about learning and knowledge.

Fountainhead values

    • Fairness: I am fair and just to all & I expect to be treated the same.
    • Responsible: I fulfill the roles entrusted to me with complete responsibility.

 

  • Respect: I accord respect and dignity to all including myself.

Learner Profile  Principled

What is ‘Academic Honesty’?                                                                                             

It refers to:

  • a set of values and skills that promote personal integrity and good practice in teaching, learning, and assessment.
  • display of respect and protection of intellectual property in all forms which include creative expression, as well as patents, registered designs, trademarks, moral rights and copyright and ensuring authenticity.
  • Promoting the use of student’s own language, expression, and ideas & appropriate acknowledgment in case the ideas or work of another person are represented.

Objectives of Academic honesty policy at Fountainhead School

 

  • To ensure that all students understand what is academic honesty.
  • To develop respect among the students for the integrity of all forms of assessment for the DP.
  • To provide guidelines to students on study skills, academic writing.
  • To provide guidelines to students on how to conduct research and how to acknowledge resources.
  • To make students understand what constitutes malpractice.
  • To make them aware of the consequences of malpractice.
  • To foster a school culture that promotes the good academic practice and actively encourages academic honesty.

What is ‘Academic Dishonesty’ or malpractice?

According to Article 27: Definition of malpractice

The IB Organization defines malpractice as behaviour that results in, or may result in, the candidate or any other candidate gaining an unfair advantage in one or more assessment components. Malpractice includes the following.

  1. Plagiarism: this is defined as the representation of the ideas or work of another person as the candidate’s own.
  1. Collusion: this is defined as supporting malpractice by another candidate, as in allowing one’s work to be copied or submitted for assessment by another.
  1. Duplication of work: this is defined as the presentation of the same work for different assessment components and/or IB diploma requirements.
  1. Any other behaviour : that gains an unfair advantage for a candidate or that affects the results of another candidate (for example taking unauthorized material into an examination, misconduct during an examination, falsifying a CAS record, disclosure of information to and receipt of information from candidates about the content of an examination paper within 24 hours after a written examination).

Systems, processes and policies at Fountainhead school to avoid academic dishonesty

At Fountainhead school the HOS along with academic team ensures that any form of malpractice to be prevented in any circumstances. To this end the following steps are taken at Fountainhead school:

  • At Fountainhead School, the management is committed to ensure that academic honesty policy  is not just applicable for Middle Years and  Diploma Programme but should be followed as a ‘whole- school policy’. This fosters the culture of academic honesty among students from a tender age.  
  • The school will ensure compliance to academic honesty (through various measures like anti plagiarism website, student undertaking etc.) that none of the student is allowed to violate the academic honesty policy in any form. Also there will be anti plagiarism committee to be formed at school consisting of members of the ALT (Academic leaders team).The HOS, PSP (Primary School Principal), SSP (Senior School Principal), the programme coordinators are members of this group. The committee members will discuss specific academic dishonesty cases and will decide on the punitive action. Apart from this, the committee member will be reviewing the academic honesty policy per year so that changes can be incorporated into the policy.
  • The candidate and their guardians are given access to ‘Regulations’ section on IB public website. This is done by placing a link to the Regulations on the Fountainhead school’s website.
  • At Fountainhead, the  school librarian is an integral part of the academic honesty exercise and plays a pivotal role in helping students in locating, evaluating and using information. The librarian also helps students find and use authoritative and reliable information from a variety of sources, print, online, people, and more.
  • Fountainhead school recognizes the support of student’s legal guardian in promoting good academic practice. In view of this the school communicates to the legal guardians about the standards the school is trying to uphold. This ensures cooperation and support of parents in encouraging academic honesty among their children.
  • At Fountainhead school every candidate studying the Middle Years Programme and Diploma Programme, regardless of their registration category, are required to sign a declaration form at the time of admission stating that all work they submit for assessment will be their own authentic work. This would effectively cover all class assignments, homework assignments and work undertaken for IB assessments and during the final IB submission will sign required consent forms made by the school and given by IB.

Role of MYPC and DPC in maintaining academic honesty at Fountainhead School

The MYPC and DPC  has significant role in maintaining academic honesty. These are as follows:

  • Organising collective and individual awareness sessions with students in order to ensure that the student community understands what constitutes academic honesty, what is an authentic piece of work and intellectual property.
  • Organising interactive sessions with senior members of the academic team and also individual subject teachers for guiding students on areas like study skills, academic writing, how to conduct research in a specific subjects and how to acknowledge resources.
  • At the time of admission to the MYP and DP programme, the MYP and DP Coordinator ensures that the student and his or her legal guardian(s) receive a copy of the General Regulations: Diploma Programme/ General regulations: Middle Years Programme – First assessment 2016 and understand its content. Further each candidate’s attention is drawn to the provisions relating to malpractice and its consequences.
  • The DPC shares the academic honesty policy of Fountainhead school with the candidate and also ensures through various collective and individual sessions that the policy is clearly and effectively communicated to the student community as a whole. Also continuous reinforcement through regular guidance from subject specific teachers is done so as to ensure that the culture of academic honesty is developed at Fountainhead School.
  • Making students understand and continuously reinforcing on what constitutes malpractice (particularly plagiarism, collusion and misconduct during an examination). Also making them aware of the consequences of being found guilty of malpractice.
  • To provide guidance to the academic team so that it can act as a role model. In this the MYP and DP Coordinator ensures that the teachers at Fountainhead school should observe the same procedures as students because student will find it difficult to follow the teacher who does not observe it himself/herself. At Fountainhead school,  teachers are advised to provide candidates with examples of how to acknowledge sources. The examples must include a variety of sources (including CD-Rom, DVD, photographs, illustrations, artwork and data) in addition to journals, books and websites.
  • To empower the academic team with resources to detect any form of malpractice.
  • To ensure that all members of the academic team understand and realize their individual responsibility in their specific subjects  for ensuring to the best of his or her knowledge, all candidates’ work accepted or submitted for assessment is the authentic work of each candidate.

Internal processes for ensuring academic honesty at Fountainhead school in relation to student work on TOK, EE, IA, ePortfolio for different subjects like Language acquisition, Design, PHE, Arts and Personal Project

The school will ensure that all submissions to IB should abide by academic honesty norms. In this context the school will ensure that each draft submitted by the student for TOK, EE, IA and ePortfolio is verified through

  • The use of Google Doc (Mandatory)
  • Viva-voce of the student (Mandatory)
  • Use of google doc Explore tool on google doc for MYP and Anti – plagiarism software – Turnitin for DP.

Step1 :

Fountainhead uses Google Apps for Education (GAFE) as a school and all staff and students are familiar with the usage of tools such as gmail, google drive, calendar etc. which will enable this step.

School is making it mandatory for all students to do their work (related to TOK, EE, IA, ePortfolio or any similar nature work) on Google Doc. Further, the student concerned needs to share the google doc(at the time of creation of the google doc and not later) with the supervisor or the teacher. The condition for sharing the google doc must be clearly communicated by the supervisor or teacher. In case of breach of the above condition the supervisor should immediately call the student and instruct him/her to share the google doc(related to TOK, EE, IA or any similar nature work) in front of the supervisor.

Step 2:

It will be the responsibility of the supervisor to check the student’s work on a regular basis

(weekly, fortnightly etc) so as to identify specific students with whom the supervisor or teacher needs to work immediately.

Step 3

For checking whether the work has been plagiarized or not, the teacher or supervisor concerned needs to check the revision history of a particular google doc(File/Revision History). If a student has copied large amount of text from another source then the academic dishonesty committed by the student can easily be identified as google doc provides the facility of minute to minute updates.The supervisor can see the minute to minute updates from “show more detailed revisions button.”

Step 4

Also if the supervisor or teacher notice that a student is writing far above than their usual level then they should check the vocabulary. The teacher or supervisor should select a sentence from the paper and paste it into the Google search bar. As we are aware that Google limits the number of characters it will search, but a sentence fits perfectly. Also it is advisable to put quotation marks around the sentence so as to find a closer match.

Step 5

Generally students use the same sources in their assignments. It is very important that various subject teachers or supervisors should collaborate much more closely on assignments of students. If the teachers suspects plagiarism then he/she should email a sentence from the assignment paper to his/her colleague/s and ask them to search it within their own Google Docs.    If the sentence also appears in one of my colleague/s students’ papers then the concerned teacher should investigate further.

Step 6

The teacher or the supervisor will be conducting viva-voce of the student so as to ensure that the work submitted by the student is his/her own. The details of the viva- voce will be kept safely with the school and will be provided to the IBO (if requested).

Step 7 (Mandatory)

MYP: The teacher will check student work using explore tool of google doc. (Select the content to be checked , right click and go to explore tool which opens google where web results are shown and can help in checking plagiarism.

DP: The teacher will put student work through anti plagiarism software (Turnitin) so as to detect plagiarism in DP.

During Examinations

For Internal Examinations

All the internal examinations are conducted by examination committee. To avoid any sort of academic dishonesty, all the examination material will be kept in a separate room (dedicated for exam purposes). Also it will be ensured that nobody will be allowed to enter the room without the permission of the examination committee members. The examination committee will be allocated an assistant who will be helping them for photocopy & printing. All the examination material will be stored in the examination room. The teachers will be submitting their papers and marking schemes to the respective HODs or Coordinator (in case of absence of HOD) for approval. After approving the question papers and marking schemes the HODs/Coordinators will forward the paper to the examination department for printing.

For External Examinations

The school’s examination committee for internal examination will also take responsibility for external examination. All the external examination material will be kept in the examination room. No academic or admin staff will be allowed to enter the examination room without the permission

Academic Honesty Practices recommended across the school community

Academic Honesty for teachers – Fair use guidelines for teachers

Rationale: Fair use guidelines for teachers to promote academic honesty.

Policy Guidelines:

Using digital resources e.g. movies, songs and other digital media:

  • Look up for resources which are available freely and legally online.
  • Avoid using latest resources which are unavailable for legal  purchase.

Movies –

  • Downloading from torrent is strictly prohibited.
  • Request library to purchase/rent the movie/documentary online from google play / iTune. If it is not available online then request to purchase the DVD.

Process:

  • To request to purchase any movie or to get it on rent, staff needs to fill Book/Audio Visual Resources Purchase form.
  • Chief Librarian will check that whether we have any alternate movie which can used in place of the movie requested by the teacher.
  • If not, she will approve the movie purchase request and library will buy/rent it online from school’s google play/ iTune account, if it is available. If it is not available online then library will process the DVD purchase request. In this case teacher has to plan in advance as DVD purchase will take 7-10 days.
  • Library has to prepare a list of movies that we have purchased (DVD/Online) and enter the details in Koha.
  • Put up Apple TV in the library so that it can used for watching movies

Books –

  • They can request for purchasing the book.
  • Scanning can only be done for only those books which we have purchased and which we intend to use for read alouds in class as the scanned copy facilitates a group read aloud better than  the smaller book. (book should be available in the library). Scanned copies can’t be shared with parents / students through any means. Often many popular read alouds are available on youtube – those links can be shared by teachers.

Songs –

  • Preferably listen/play from youtube.
  • Download it from iTunes or gaana.com at a nominal price.

In practice by staff members:

  • Any work done for the school is school’s property.
    • This means that the school’s coordinators or leaders need not take the permission from the teachers to share it further.
  • Credit will be given to the teacher who has prepared it for 1 academic  year. In the following years the documents can be used by others as then it’s school’s property.
  • If any document which has been created collaboratively and uploaded on any official site like OCC etc. then the credit has to be given to all the people involved stating that it is being posted on the behalf of the following staff members.
  • Most of the work should be represented as collaborative work if presented to any external body.
  • If we are sharing student/teacher work within school or also outside school, please acknowledge them.
  • Everyone has to learn and use the same type of citation -i.e  MLA 7 and apply to all official documents sent out of the school or posted on school website or curriculum site.  Documents to be submitted to IB should be cited using MLA 7 citation.
  • Teachers need to paste the link of the website used for making worksheets/preparing presentation/preparing formative or summative assessments/term papers.
  • All images should be cited on the same slide in case of presentation or under the image in docs used. Image link should not be added in the speaker notes.
  • Report card comments can be used by others after each Academic Year without any acknowledgement.
  • The citation of resource book or textbook used from the library should be added at the end of a doc or presentation in form of bibliography.

Use of MLA citation

The use of MLA citation is recommended for all assignments/research work of students and academic work of teachers .The reason for choosing MLA citation is as follows:

MLA 7 is user-friendly and will ensure that students are able to add the citation quickly and easier.The seventh edition is a comprehensive, up-to-date guide to research and writing in the online environment. It provides an authoritative update of MLA documentation style for use in student writing, including simplified guidelines for citing works published on the Web and new recommendations for citing several kinds of works, such as digital files and graphic narratives.

Reason : Using MLA Style properly makes it easier for readers to navigate and comprehend a text by providing familiar cues when referring to sources and borrowed information. Editors and instructors also encourage everyone to use the same format so there is consistency of style within a given field. Abiding by MLA’s standards as a writer will allow you to:        

  • Provide your readers with cues they can use to follow your ideas more efficiently and to locate information of interest to them.
  • Allow readers to focus more on your ideas by not distracting them with unfamiliar or complicated formatting.
  • Establish your credibility or ethos in the field by demonstrating an awareness of your audience and their needs as fellow researchers (particularly concerning the citing of references).

In addition to the above Google docs provide the option of citing the sources through MLA & APA citation styles. This will make it convenient for students to cite the sources.

Plan for teaching MLA 7 citation to students gradewise:

Grade 7: Using MLA 7 to cite weblink and images.

Grade 8: Using MLA 7 to cite videos.

Grade 9: Using MLA 7 to cite Scholarly articles.

Grade 10: Using MLA 7 to cite books.

Grade 11 and 12: Revision of citation learnt in MYP and application of it in all IB submissions.

Refer Appendix 2 for detailed Training Plan of teaching Citation skills for students and teachers

Note: Students should use MLA 7 citation for referencing when doing IB submissions. It is mandatory to add in text citation and bibliography in the document or presentation they are submitting.

Citation examples for students to refer:

Refer Appendix -11 Citation samples for students to refer when they are citing sources.

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty

It is not sufficient for students to only understand academic honesty at the conceptual level but they should be able to apply the same in their work. As an important stakeholder of the Fountainhead school, students are ethically responsible to report any incident of violation of Academic Honesty Policy to MYPC/DPC/SSP or HOS. It is important to mention here that Fountainhead school community shows no tolerance for any form of malpractice. The following steps will be taken in case of detection of academic dishonesty by students.

Severity and previous record will be taken into consideration.

Step 1 : Firstly, the student will be given written warning through mail (both to student and parents). Also the same will be communicated through the student handbook.

Step 2: If the student repeats the same mistake again then the school will call the parents and anti- plagiarism committee members will discuss the matter with parents (in the presence of student) along with the consequences that follows such an action. The student and parent will be strictly communicated that repetition of any such action in future will lead to suspension from school. In addition to this the school will be keeping record of the student on individual basis with details of the incident and action taken by the school.

Step 3: If the student repeats the same mistake again then the school has full right to suspend the student for a maximum period of seven  days. The action taken by the school will be decided by anti-plagiarism committee and the same will be communicated to the parent (along with justification for such an action) through mail. During the suspension period the student will not be allowed to enter the school premises and attend any of the classes or take part in any activity related to the school. The HOS and MYPC/DPC in consultation with anti- plagiarism committee members will have full right to revoke the suspension or extend the period of suspension, if the need arises. The decision taken by the HOS and DPC will final in this regard.

Step 4: If the student keeps on repeating the same mistake then the school will have full right to expel the student from the school. Such decision will be taken by HOS and MYPC/DPC in consultation with the anti plagiarism committee members. For being given such a severe punishment, the student must have been suspended at least  twice previously in context of academic dishonesty.

Revision of Academic Honesty Policy

DP/MYP Coordinator along with Heads of Departments and teacher librarian, will be collectively responsible for annual review of the Academic Honesty Policy for the first three years and after that the review will be done every two years. After review the recommendation will be sent to HOS and after the approval of HOS the suggested changes will be incorporated in the policy. The link to the revised policy will be given on the school’s website and all the stakeholders will be notified regarding the same through mail and blog.

Works Consulted

Appendices

Appendix 1.1 : Declaration of Originality

This declaration covers all class assignments, homework assignments and work undertaken for IB assessments while you are a student of the Fountainhead School, located at Surat, Gujarat, India.

Further, no written work/CD-Rom or in any other form will be accepted unless the declaration has been completed and attached.

Name of the student:                         ……………………………………………………

IB Candidate No. /School Roll No. ……………………………………………………

Topic of work:                            …………………………………………………..

Type of work:                                          ……………………………………………………

Declaration of Originality

  1. I declare that this ……………………………………… (eg essay, report, project, assignment, CD -ROM, audio visual material etc) is my own original work. Where other people’s work has been used (either from a printed source, Internet or any other source), this has been properly acknowledged and referenced in accordance with school’s Academic Honesty Policy requirements.
  2. I have not used work previously produced by another student or any other person to hand in as my own.
  3. I have not allowed, and will not allow, anyone to copy my work with the intention of passing it off as his or her own work.
  4. I understand that the above written work may be tested electronically for plagiarism.

SIGNATURE :         .………………………………………………………………………………

Appendix 1.2 : Candidate consent form for eCoursework upload

Candidate Consent

By signing this declaration you understand and consent to

1) the programme coordinator or another authorized school staff member uploading your work to the IB’s eCoursework system and

2) the IB’s processing, use, disclosure, and transfer of your personal data, including without limitation any sensitive personal data and/or education records, as described in the IB’s privacy policy and the Privacy Supplement, including worldwide cross-border transfers (including storage and access of such data outside of your country of residence).

You also confirm that you are at least 15 years old and that the version of any materials you pass to your programme coordinator or another school staff member is the correct and final version, is your own work and that you have correctly acknowledged the work of others. Failure to do this will be investigated as a breach of IB regulations.

Signature…………………………………………………………………………………..

 

Print name………………………………………………………………………………..

 

Date……………………………….

Note: We have made changes to the student undertaking template as available on IB information system (ibis.ibo.org)

Source: ibis.ibo.org

Appendix 1.3: Sticker for IB submission on hard copy before submission (School process)

Appendix 2: Plan of teaching citation to students & teachers

Teachers are trained prior to citation training sessions with students as a continous practice.

Academic honesty and citation session plan
Citation guidelines document for students to refer to https://docs.google.com/document/d/1bfr56FwTDs6vslNbvW-WDaSlq6IQJKBZr91EaWy50nA/edit#
Grade 7 : Using MLA 7 to cite weblink and images.
Task 1 Read /Show a well-known story or an inspirational story with your class. Ask students, in turn, to make a comment on it. Every comment has to be something no one has said before. Students will have increasing difficulty finding original ideas, experiencing that originality is virtually impossible if something has already been discussed extensively. Comments will necessarily include the opinions of others. The student’s original contribution will often rest on a critical and informed evaluation of sources, selecting and combining material to shape a new product. The teacher should emphasize that effective use of sources, when properly cited and referenced, will always count in the student’s favour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXbf0QSiLv4 5 -6 mins- watching video
Reflection questions 15 mins – Reflection
1. What is the one most important learning?
2. One thing you like to change
3. One thing you can connect with.
Task 2 Video on Plagiarism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pmab92ghG0M 2 mins
Task 3
Citation How to cite a web link and image 10 mins
Citation Tool (Cite this for me) http://www.citethisforme.com/ 10 mins
Teacher demo Mentor teacher should show demonstrate citation of one weblink and one image on screen before students start citing. The school uses MLA 7 citation method. The author’s surname is used first and then the first name for citation. The year of publication and the accessed date is very important.
Steps to be followed for citation Refme is now called “Cite this for me”

http://www.citethisforme.com/
Steps:

1. Login through google account.

2. Second tab: Citation style: Go for MLA 7

3. Click on website symbol with plus sign and add url. It will autocite.

4. Go to final step.

5. Add reference.

Students need to cite the following websites as a practice. Website
1 Search for a weblink which gives you information about industrial revolution
2 http://history-world.org/Industrial%20Intro.htm
3 http://www.innerbody.com/
Image
1 http://www.rajivvij.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Mahatma-Gandhi.jpg
2 Search for mitocondria image and cite it
Grade 8: Using MLA 7 to cite videos.
Task 1 Show this video clip
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0wsiLdPVWQ Exspyda. MUSIC PLAGIARISM: The Most Obvious Song Copies! (46 SONGS!) Biggest Plagiarism Claims. 2014. Web. 13 July 2017 . <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0wsiLdPVWQ>.
Ask them to reflect what they have heard in the video. Use Think, Pair and Share strategy
Task 2 Why citations are important? Students need to watch this video after their reflection.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtxOKWRIJpk
Task 3 Teaching them to cite videos
Refme is now called “Cite this for me”

http://www.citethisforme.com/
Steps:

1. Login through google account.

2. Second tab: Citation style: Go for MLA 7 and further MLA7 with url

3. Click on Other symbol beside website symbol with plus sign and click on onlie video option.

4. Add data manually.

4. Go to final step.

5. Add reference.

Example:

RefMe. Why Citations Are Important?. 2016. Web. 12 July 2017 . <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtxOKWRIJpk>.

Practice links
Link 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bk7McNUjWgw BBC Earth. Flying Fish Picked Off From Above And Below – The Hunt – BBC Earth. 2017. Web. 12 July 2017 . <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bk7McNUjWgw>.
Link 2 http://natgeotv.com/in/secrets-of-the-king-cobra/videos/secrets-of-the-king-cobra National Geographic. Secrets Of The King Cobra. 2011. Web. 12 July 2017 . <http://natgeotv.com/in/secrets-of-the-king-cobra/videos/secrets-of-the-king-cobra>.
Link 3 https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-to-spot-a-misleading-graph-lea-gaslowitz Gaslowitz, Lea. How To Spot A Misleading Graph. 2017. Web. 12 July 2017 . <https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-to-spot-a-misleading-graph-lea-gaslowitz>.
Grade 9 and  10 : Using MLA 7 to cite books Distribute describing wheel handout in groups assigned Refme is now called “Cite this for me”

http://www.citethisforme.com/
Steps:

1. Login through google account.

2. Second tab: Citation style: Go for MLA 7 with url

3. Click on the more symbol and select book or directly book with plus sign and add url. if it is online book or add details manualy if it is a hard copy.

4. Go to final step.

5. Add reference.

Task 1 . Have students place the words “giving credit” in the center of the Describing Wheel. then ask following questions.
Source of idea: http://mytpl.org/wp-content/uploads/TFT-LP-8-When-and-Why-to-Cite-Sources1.pdf 1. Could anything bad happen to you if you copied someone else’s idea or words and didn’t give them credit? (bad grade, suspeneded from school/college, lose your credibility, pay a fine, go to jail)

2. How would you feel if someone stole your idea and didn’t give you credit – what do you think should happen to them if they do?

3. Why might it be unfair to use someone else’s work without giving them credit?

4.How does it help YOU when you cite sources? (shows you know what you are talking about, credible sources give you authority)

5. How might it help your reader if you cite sources (can learn more from the books you read, know if they can trust your arguments)

6. How would you feel if you posted something really cool on Facebook and a bunch of people shared it as if it was their own witty comment, not giving you credit?

Task 2 Take students to senior library and divide them into group.
Demonstrate them how to cite a book first.
Give students 3-4 books on the table and tell them to cite on their own.
example
Book The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown Brown, Dan. The Lost Symbol: Special Illustrated Edition. 1st ed. Doubleday; Spl Ill edition: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2010. Print.
Grade 11
Focus Scenarios for Academic misconduct
20 minutes- preparation time Scenarios for Academic misconduct – Teachers to collect print of scenarions from Bhargavi Ma’am. Teachers to divide (group wise) students. Students will read the scenarios and will prepare for role play.
30 minutes Role play
Grade 12 Idea source: McClain, Rachel. “Cite Your Sites!”. The Learning Network., 2017. Web. 6 June 2017.
Focus What is internet plagiarism? Time alloted
Task 1 Students respond to the following scenario in a post it (written on the board or handed out prior to class): “You and a friend have been working on your final research papers for one of your classes for the past month. The night before the papers are due, you get together for an all-night editing session. At 1 a.m., your friend’s computer dies, and he loses his entire paper. He has no back-up disk. Your friend is devastated, and he decides to download a paper off of an Internet term paper site. How do you respond to his actions?” After giving students a few minutes to write, have some students share their responses with the class. Then, develop a class definition of plagiarism. 10 minutes
Task 2 As a class, read the article “Lessons in Internet Plagiarism,” focusing on the following questions: http://www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/featured_articles/20010629friday.html 20 minutes
a. How did Ms. Prestebak discover that the high school student had taken his paper off the Internet? Worksheet link:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B0cP4OjOEyKzOVd2aENRMXpSTEE
b. How has the temptation to cheat been increased by access to the Internet?
c. What happened at the University of Virginia with regards to this topic?
d. What did Donald McCabe’s survey reveal?
e. According to Cathy Aubrecht, what is a sign that a student has plagiarized?
f. What are some of the consequences for plagiarism?
g. What are some resources that schools can use to find out if students are plagiarizing materials?
Task 3 Citation task using cite this for me 15 minutes
Blog post http://www.greenpeace.org/india/en/Blog/Guest-blog/powering-ecological-agriculture-in-india/blog/57130/ Refme is now called “Cite this for me”

http://www.citethisforme.com/
Steps:

1. Login through google account.

2. Second tab: Citation style: Go for MLA 7

3. Click on website symbol with plus sign and add url. It will autocite.

4. Go to final step.

5. Add reference.

Singhal, Prateek. “Powering Ecological Agriculture In India”. Greenpeace India 2017. Web. 13 June 2017 . <http://www.greenpeace.org/india/en/Blog/Guest-blog/powering-ecological-agriculture-in-india/blog/57130/>.
Image http://www.silverdoctors.com/gold/gold-news/jim-willie-extreme-gold-market-supply-vs-demand/ Jim Willie: Extreme Gold Market: Supply Vs Demand. 2013. Web. 13 June 2017 . <http://www.silverdoctors.com/gold/gold-news/jim-willie-extreme-gold-market-supply-vs-demand/>.
Video https://www.ted.com/talks/emily_oster_flips_our_thinking_on_aids_in_africa Oster, Emily. Flip Your Thinking On AIDS In Africa. 2007. Web. 13 June 2017 . <https://www.ted.com/talks/emily_oster_flips_our_thinking_on_aids_in_africaTed>.
Scholarly articles http://www.currentscience.ac.in/Volumes/111/02/0243.pdf RAJPUT1, KISHORE S. et al. “Relocation Of Ophioglossum Gramineum Willd (Ophioglossaceae)”. Current Science 111.2 (2017): 242-243. Web. 13 June 2017 . <http://www.currentscience.ac.in/Volumes/111/02/0243.pdf>.
Book The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown Brown, Dan. The Lost Symbol: Special Illustrated Edition. 1st ed. Doubleday; Spl Ill edition: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2010. Print.
social media Https://t.co/a5N61F9LvR
News article http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21703263-stress-test-results-do-little-dampen-worries-about-italys-lenders-still

Appendix 3 : Advantage and examples of Intellectual property

  1. What are Intellectual property rights?

Ans.The intellectual property rights are rights granted in relation to the use of intellectual property. There are many different forms of intellectual property rights, such as patents, registered designs, trademarks, moral rights and copyright. It is important to understand that these rights(related to works of literature, art or music)  are normally protected by law and hence must be respected.

Benefits of respecting intellectual property rights

  1. The most obvious benefit is that a student can avoid legal implications which might affect his/her career in the long term.
  2. Second obvious reason is that the result of the student will be adversely affected in case they are caught by IB for academic dishonesty.
  3. Thirdly the social implications attached in terms of insult of being labelled in society as academically dishonest student.

Appendix 4 : Advantages and examples of authentic authorship

Advantages of authentic authorship :

  • The clear benefits of authentic authorship is that student takes pride in his/her own work(irrespective of whether he/she score high grades or not). At least he/she is clear in conscious that he/she has not done anything wrong.
  • Also the student can save himself/herself from the legal implications of being academically dishonest.
  • Further authentic authorship leads to increase in knowledge base which is not the case in case of plagiarism.

Example: A candidate could provide a footnote or endnote in the following manner if an idea emerged as a result of discussion with, or listening to, a fellow student, a teacher or any other person: “The basis of this idea was originally expressed by a fellow student during a theory of knowledge seminar”.

Appendix 5: Guidance on distinction between legitimate collaboration and unacceptable collusion

It is very important to understand the difference between legitimate collaboration and unacceptable collusion.

  1. What is legitimate collaboration?

Any constructive educational and intellectual practice that aims to facilitate optimal learning outcomes through interaction between students.

Examples of legitimate collaboration include project work(where each students provide his/her own contribution and if any content has been taken from other source then the same is fully acknowledged)            

  1. What is collusion?

Ans. Collusion occurs when, unless with official approval (e.g. in the case of group projects), two or more students consciously collaborate in the preparation and production of work which is ultimately submitted by each in an identical, or substantially similar, form and/or is represented by each to be the product of his or her individual efforts. Collusion also occurs where there is unauthorised co-operation between a student and another person in the preparation and production of work which is presented as the student’s own.

The above mentioned collusion is unacceptable

Appendix 6 : Article 28 –  Applicable procedure for malpractice

Concerned Individuals/Communities :

  • Head of the school, Academic Coordinator and Teacher community.
  • Student and Parent community

28.1 The school’s Diploma Programme/Middle Years Programme  coordinator must inform the IB Organization if he or she identifies any malpractice (for example, plagiarism) in relation to a candidate’s work after the candidate has signed the cover sheet to the effect that it is his or her own work and constitutes the final version of that work. In such cases, or when an examiner or the IB Organization suspects malpractice, the school will be required to conduct an investigation and provide the IB Organization with relevant documentation concerning the case. If questions arise about the authenticity of a candidate’s work before the cover sheet has been signed, that is, before the work has reached its final stage, the situation must be resolved within the school.

28.2 Candidates suspected of malpractice will be invited, through the school’s Diploma Programme coordinator, to present a written explanation or defence.

28.3 Cases of suspected of malpractice will be presented to the final award committee, or a sub-committee of the final award committee. After reviewing all evidence collected during the investigation, the committee will decide whether to dismiss the allegation, uphold it or ask for further investigations to be made.

Malpractice explained in detail :

Malpractice generally includes the following elements:

    • Plagiarism
    • Collusion
    • Duplication of work
    • Any other behaviour that gains an unfair advantage for the candidate or that affects the results of another candidate.

Plagiarism:

It is defined as the representation of ideas or work of another person as student’s own works.

Some common types of Plagiarism are :

Copying of information from Internet :

It is the widespread belief in student community that the internet is in the public domain and the information can be taken from the websites without any acknowledgement. However this is an incorrect perception and needs to be rectified. It is essential for candidates to record the addresses of all websites from which they obtain information during their research, including the date when each website was accessed. The requirement to cite the source of material includes the copying of maps, photographs, illustrations, data, graphs and so on.

Copying from another form of electronic media

In order to prevent plagiarism, it is of utmost significance that the CDRoms, DVDs, email messages and any other electronic media must be treated in the same way as the internet, books and journals.

Plagiarism in Group 6

The issue of plagiarism is not limited to subjects in groups 1 to 5 of the Diploma Programme. It must be noted that the copying works of art, whether music, film, dance, theatre arts or visual arts, without proper acknowledgment, may also constitute plagiarism. While accepting the creative use of the work of another artist it is significant to acknowledge the original source. Candidates must understand that passing off the work of another person as their own is not acceptable and constitutes malpractice, regardless of whether the act was intentional.

Copying text, or other material

Although not always a deliberate attempt, but if a candidate presents the ideas or work of another person as their own, this is will be considered as plagiarism.

Collusion:

It is important to understand the difference between collaboration and collusion. Collaboration is a term used for working together on a common aim with shared information. In collaboration there is open and cooperative behaviour that does not result in copying one’s work. On the contrary collusion is defined as supporting malpractice by another candidate in terms of allowing one’s work to be copied or submitted for assessment by another.[taken from IB guide on Academic honesty]

Duplication of work: this is defined as the presentation of the same work for different assessment components and/or diploma requirements. ).

Any other behaviour that gains an unfair advantage for a candidate or that affects the results

of another candidate (for example, taking unauthorized material into an examination room,

misconduct during an examination, falsifying a CAS record).

Appendix 7 : Malpractice during assessment

  • leaving and/or accessing unauthorized material in a bathroom/restroom that may be visited during an examination
  • misconduct during an examination, including any attempt to disrupt the examination or distract another candidate
  • exchanging information or in any way supporting the passing on of information to another
  • candidate about the content of an examination.
  • failing to comply with the instructions of the invigilator or other member of the school’s staff responsible for the conduct of the examination
  • impersonating another candidate
  • stealing examination papers
  • Using an unauthorized calculator during an examination, or using a calculator when one is not permitted for the examination paper
  • disclosing or discussing the content of an examination paper with a person outside the

immediate school community within 24 hours after the examination.

Appendix 8: Scenarios  for malpractice cases

Some scenarios  for Plagiarism

Scenario 1: There is clear evidence in the form of source material to support a decision that the candidate has plagiarized text without any attempt to acknowledge the source(s). This includes the use of unacknowledged text in oral examinations and the use of other media, such as graphs, illustrations and data.

Principle: If there is clear evidence of plagiarism with no acknowledgment of the source(s), the candidate will be found guilty of malpractice without regard for any alleged lack of intent to plagiarize. A statement from the candidate, teacher or coordinator stating that the copying was the result of an oversight or mistake by the candidate will not be considered as a mitigating factor.

PenaltyNo grade will be awarded in the subject concerned

Scenario 2 : A candidate takes text from the Internet and translates it into another language for use in his/her work without acknowledging the source.

Principle Regardless of whether text has been translated by the candidate, the ideas or work of another person must be acknowledged. This is still plagiarism.

PenaltyNo grade will be awarded in the subject concerned.

Scenario 3 : A candidate copies a work of art without acknowledging the source.

Principle Plagiarism as a breach of regulations includes all media and is not confined to text.

PenaltyNo grade will be awarded in the subject concerned.

Scenario 4 —A candidate submits a piece of work with the coversheet signed to the effect that it is his/her authentic work and is the final version of that work. There is clear evidence of plagiarism. The candidate claims in his/her statement that the wrong version was submitted by mistake.

PrincipleBy signing the coversheet the candidate has declared the work to be the final version of the work, therefore it is that work which will be considered and not another version. However, if the school was able to provide compelling evidence to prove it was a genuine mistake by the candidate, the correct work would be accepted and no further action taken.

Penalty If the candidate is found guilty of malpractice no grade will be awarded in the subject concerned.

Scenario  for Collusion

Scenario A candidate allows another candidate to copy all or part of his/her work. The candidate who copies the work then submits that work as his/her own.

Principle A candidate who allows his/her work to be copied constitutes behaviour that results in, or may result in, another candidate gaining an unfair advantage, which constitutes malpractice.

PenaltyBoth candidates will be found guilty of malpractice and no grade awarded for the subject concerned.

Scenario  for Duplication of work

ScenarioA candidate hands in work that is the same or substantially similar to two different

assessment components.

PrincipleDepending on the specific requirements of a subject, a candidate may use the same

topic for different assessment components, but that topic must be researched, written or otherwise presented using an entirely different approach. Using work that is the same or substantially similar for two different components is not acceptable.

PenaltyNo grade will be awarded in the subjects concerned.

Some scenarios  for Misconduct during an examination

Scenario 1 The candidate is found to be in possession of unauthorized material during a written or oral examination (for example, a cell/mobile phone, textbook).

Principle Possession of unauthorized material is sufficient reason to find a candidate guilty of

malpractice. Whether or not a candidate did gain, could have gained, or intended to gain, an

advantage by using the unauthorized material will not be taken into account.

Penalty No grade will be awarded in the subject concerned.

Scenario 2 A candidate disobeys the instructions of the invigilator. The instructions are in compliance with the IB regulations for the conduct of examinations.

Principle If the conduct of the candidate is such that he/she gains an unfair advantage (for example, continuing to write answers to questions when told to stop) or may affect the results of another candidate (for example, behaviour that is a distraction to other candidates), this will constitute malpractice.

Penalty No grade will be awarded in the subject concerned.

Appendix 9 : Action taken by IB if a candidate is found guilty of academic dishonesty.

  • The IB committee will impose the penalty  according to the nature of the offence. However, the committee will take into consideration all the information presented by teachers and the coordinator in their statements on the case.
  • When judging a case of alleged malpractice the committee will disregard the registration category of the candidate. If a candidate is found guilty, the aim is to penalize the candidate only for the subject in which he or she has been found guilty of malpractice.
  • Work submitted by a candidate for assessment may contravene standard academic practice by failing to acknowledge the ideas or words of another person using quotation marks (or some other accepted practice). However, if there is some attempt by the candidate to acknowledge the source in the bibliography or in a footnote, the final award committee may designate a case of this type an academic infringement and not malpractice.If the final award committee decides that an academic infringement has been established, no mark will be awarded for the component or part(s) of the component. The candidate will still be eligible for a grade in the subject or diploma requirement concerned.
  • If the final award committee decides that a case of malpractice has been established, no grade will be awarded in the subject concerned. (No lesser penalty for malpractice is available to the final award committee.) In the case of a Diploma Programme candidate the consequence is that no diploma will be awarded to the candidate. However, a Diploma Programme courses results will be awarded for other subjects in which no malpractice has occurred.
  • If a candidate is found guilty of malpractice in his or her third attempt at achieving the diploma or improving the number of points for the diploma, the candidate will not be permitted a fourth examination session in which to achieve the diploma or improve the number of diploma points.
  • If a candidate is found guilty of malpractice the candidate will be permitted to register for future examinations sessions in which malpractice was established, including the session that follows six months later (subject to the provisions of sections 11.7 and 11.10, and other restrictions stated in the Regulations or Handbook of procedures for the Diploma Programme).
  • If a candidate is found guilty of malpractice in the production of one (or more) of several assignments required for a component, the candidate is not eligible for a mark based on his or her performance in the remaining assignments for the component; no grade will be awarded for the subject.For example, the internal assessment requirement for a subject may require a portfolio of four separate assignments. If a candidate is found to have plagiarized all or part of one assignment, a mark for his or her internal assessment will not be based on the remaining three assignments: no grade will be awarded for the subject.
  • If a case of malpractice is very serious, either because of its nature or because the candidate has already been found guilty of malpractice in a previous session, the final award committee may decide that the candidate will not be permitted to register for examinations in any future session.
  • An IB diploma, or a certificate, may be withdrawn from a candidate at any time if malpractice is subsequently established. This includes the enquiry upon results service when, for example, a senior examiner may identify plagiarism in a piece of work that previously went unnoticed by the teacher or other examiner.

Appendix 10 : Objectives of imposing penalties by IB

  • To ensure that the candidate does not gain an unfair advantage
  • To maintain the integrity of the examination session by excluding those candidates who    
  • have abused the system.
  • To deter other candidates from taking the same action.

Appendix 11 : Citation Samples

Category 1: Citing printed sources

1a: Citing a book

Example 1:

Author Dan Brown
Title The Lost Symbol
Publisher / Sponsor Transworld Publishers
Date or Year when it was published/ modified 2010
Medium of publication Print
In text citation Bibliography
(Brown, 2010) Brown, Dan. The Lost Symbol. London: Transworld Publishers, 2010. Print.
Author Carl Sagan
Title The Demon- Haunted World
Publisher / Sponsor Random House Publishing group
Date or Year when it was published/ modified 1996
Medium of publication Print
In text citation Bibliography
(Sagan, 1996) Sagan, Carl. The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark. 1996. New York: Random House Publishing Group, 2000. Print.2016.

1b  Citing a magazine (Print)

Author Gothekar Pada
Title Child Malnutrition in India
Publisher / Sponsor The Economist
Date or Year when it was published/ modified 25th September – 1st October 2010
Medium of publication Print
In text citation Bibliography
(Pada,2010) Pada, Gothekar. “Child Malnutrition in India.” The Economist 2010: 5–110. Print.2016.

Category 2: Citing non-print electronic sources

2a: Citing a website

Website (Example 1):  News article (Digital edition)

Author If no author, keep the field blank
Title

European bank   Still stressed out

Web site (in italics) economist.com
Publisher / Sponsor The Economist Newspaper Limited
Date when it was published/ modified Aug 6th 2016
Medium of publication Web
Accessed date Aug 5th 2016
URL http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21703263-stress-test-results-do-little-dampen-worries-about-italys-lenders-still
In text citation Bibliography

(“European Banks Still Stressed out”)

“European Banks Still stressed out.” economist.com. The Economist, 6 Aug. 2016. Web. 5 Aug. 2016. <http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21703263-stress-test-results-do-little-dampen-worries-about-italys-lenders-still>.

Website (Example 2):  Blog posts

Author Prateek Singhal

Title

Powering Ecological Agriculture in India

Web site (in italics) greenpeace.org
Publisher / Sponsor Greenpeace India
Date when it was published/ modified 27 July , 2016
Medium of publication Web
Accessed date 5th August, 2016
URL http://www.greenpeace.org/india/en/Blog/Guest-blog/powering-ecological-agriculture-in-india/blog/57130/
In text citation Bibliography
(Singhal) Singhal, Prateek. “Powering ecological agriculture in India.” greenpeace.org. Greenpeace India, 27 July 2016. Web. 5 Aug. 2016. <http://www.greenpeace.org/india/en/Blog/Guest-blog/powering-ecological-agriculture-in-india/blog/57130/>.

Website (Example 3):  Journal article in pdf format

When there are more than three authors

Author Kishore S. Rajput, Ronak N. Kachhiya Patel , V. M. Raole and Anirudh Pratap Singh
(Kishore S. Rajput et al)
Editor R. Srinivasan ( This information will be at the bottom of the website
Title Relocation of Ophioglossum gramineum Willd (Ophioglossaceae)
Web site (in italics) currentscience.ac.in
Publisher and Place of Publication Current Science, Madras

(Check for this information at the bottom of the website)

Date when it was published/ modified 25 July 2016
Medium of publication Web
Accessed date 5th August,2016
URL http://www.currentscience.ac.in/Volumes/111/02/0243.pdf
In text citation Bibliography
(Rajput et al.) Rajput, Kishore, et al. Relocation of Ophioglossum Gramineum Willd (Ophioglossaceae). 111 vols. Madras: Current Science, 25 July 2016. Web. 5 Aug. 2016. <http://www.currentscience.ac.in/Volumes/111/02/0243.pdf>.

Website (Example 4):  Research paper in pdf format (Google scholar)

Author Neeraj Sharma and Rashmi Vamil
Editor P. Muthuprasanna
Title Effect of different heavy metals and ph on α-amylase production from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.
Volume no. / issue no. Vol 3/ Issue 2
Web site (in italics) ijpbs.net
Publisher and Place of Publication International Journal of Pharma and Bio Science, India
Date/Year  when it was published/ modified 2012
Medium of publication Web
Accessed date 5th August,2016
URL http://www.ijpbs.net/vol-3/issue-2/bio/61.pdf
In text citation Bibliography

(Sharma and Vamil)

 

Sharma, Neeraj, and Rashmi Vamil. “Effect of Different Heavy Metals and Ph on α-Amylase Production from Bacillus Amyloliquefaciens.” International Journal of Pharma and Bio Science, India 3.2 (2012): B–545 – 550. Web. 5 Aug. 2016. <http://www.ijpbs.net/vol-3/issue-2/bio/61.pdf>.

Website (Example 5):  General Information

Source Porsche
Title The Porsche Principle
Web site (in italics) porsche.com
Publisher Porsche Centre Mumbai
Year  when it was published/ modified 2016
Medium of publication Web
Accessed date 5 th August,2016
URL http://www.porsche.com/middle-east/_mumbai_/aboutporsche/principleporsche/
In text citation Bibliography

 (“The Porsche Principle”,2016)

“The Porsche Principle.” porsche.com. Porsche Centre Mumbai, 2016. Web. 5 Aug. 2016. <http://www.porsche.com/middle-east/_mumbai_/aboutporsche/principleporsche/>

Category 3: Citing online video clip

Example : TED video

Author/ Speaker Emily Oster
(Go to video option in Refme)
Title Flip your thinking on AIDS in Africa
Web site (in italics) ted.com
Publisher TED
Year  when it was filmed 2007
Medium of publication Web
Accessed date 10th August 2016
URL https://www.ted.com/talks/emily_oster_flips_our_thinking_on_aids_in_africa
In text citation Bibliography

Oster, 2007

.Oster, Emily. “Flip Your Thinking on AIDS in Africa.” TED, 12 July 2007. Web. 10 Aug. 2016. <https://www.ted.com/talks/emily_oster_flips_our_thinking_on_aids_in_africa>.

Example : You tube  video

Author/ Speaker (Go to video option in Refme)
Title Pavlov experiments in conditioning
Web site (in italics) YouTube
Publisher YouTube
Year  when it was filmed 2010
Medium of publication Web
Accessed date 10th August,2016
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5rXSjId0q4
In text citation Bibliography
(“Pavlov Experiments in Conditioning”,2010 .“Pavlov experiments in conditioning.” YouTube. YouTube, 2 Nov. 2010. Web. 10 Aug. 2016. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5rXSjId0q4>.

Category 4 : Citing a DVD

Author Dan Clifton
Title Attack on Pearl Harbor
Web site (in italics)
Publisher / Sponsor BBC / India Today Group
Date when it was published/ modified 2010
Medium of publication DVD
Accessed date 10 August 2016
URL
In text citation Bibliography
(Clifton,2010) Attack on Pearl Harbor. By Dan Clifton. Dir. Dan Clifton. 2010. The India Today Group, 2010. DVD.2016.

Category 5: Citing social media

Example : Twitter

Author/ Speaker Vicki Davis
Title Every child needs a champion. Awesome graphic from Sylvia Duckworth!
Web site (in italics)
Publisher
Year  when it was filmed
Medium of publication Web
Accessed date 10th August,2016
URL/Handle Https://t.co/a5N61F9LvR
In text citation Bibliography
(Davis, 2016) .“Vicki Davis on Twitter: “Every child needs a champion. Awesome graphic from Sylvia Duckworth! Https://t.co/a5N61F9LvR”” 9 Aug. 2016, Web.

Category 6: Citing an image

Example : Graph
Graph : Demand and Supply curve for gold market

Author/ Speaker Jim Willie

(Go the website where the image is given)

Title Jim Willie: Extreme gold market: Supply vs demand
Web site (in italics) Silver Doctors
Publisher
Date and Year 29th July,2013
Medium of publication Web
Accessed date 20, Aug 2016
URL http://www.silverdoctors.com/gold/gold-news/jim-willie-extreme-gold-market-supply-vs-demand/
In text citation Bibliography
(Willie,2013) Willie, Jim. “Jim Willie: Extreme gold market: Supply vs demand.” Silver Doctors. 29 July 2013. Web. 20 Aug. 2016. <http://www.silverdoctors.com/gold/gold-news/jim-willie-extreme-gold-market-supply-vs-demand/>

Work cited: https://app.refme.com/home#/project/2397338

 
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